Archive for the 'General' Category

Notes on Clickers

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Clickers

Some notes on physical and virtual classroom “clickers” that I’ve maintained in Evernote over the years and shared a few times. Seemed like a good thing to blog about.

Phone-based:

  • Turning Technologies has physical clickers and smart-phone clickers

    www.turningtechnologies.ca/

    If you are using a textbook from Nelson or Pearson there might be a chance that you could get the software and base for free from them — but the students would have to pay. ITS’ AV Services also have around 50 of these for sign-out.

  • Top Hat Monocle

    www.tophatmonocle.com/

    Uses phones, laptops, etc. and they are always keen to do a demo.

  • Poll Everywhere

    www.polleverywhere.com

    Is free for under 40 people but gets expensive as numbers are added.

iOS-based:

  • Socrative http://www.socrative.com/
  • Flexible and free. Waiting for other shoe to drop. What Mr. Clare Sr. uses.

Web/Smart-phone based:

  • Mentimeter https://www.mentimeter.com/
    It is new and promises to be free, but I have not used it.
  • mqlicker www.mqlicker.com/
    is new and promises to be free, but I have not used it.
    A Brock University Economics prof really liked this option
  • Not free at all is:

Also:

Then the Chronicle of Higher Ed. has some quick idea for low-tech clickers:

chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/low-tech-alternatives-to-clickers/34184

Live classroom interaction, polling, chat…

  • Piazza https://piazza.com/

    Piazza allows for large groups to ask questions and vote up the important ones. It is a very interesting way to get feedback in a large class. It is free and has an LTI integration that the CPI can add to any Isaak/Sakai site.  It surprises me how often instructors interested in “simple” polling like the realtime feedback Piazza gives.

  • More survey & marketing style http://www.signalhq.com/
    Signal – good buzz (possibly for the API) with a free trial

Rally of the Tall Pines 2013

Sunday, December 1st, 2013


Rally of the Tall Pines 2013, a set on Flickr.

Some great weather at a great location.

Toronto Indy 2013

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013


Firestone TireAmerica, F@#% Yeah!
Saturday Paul Tracy negotiates for a Stadium Super Truck ride on SundayPaul TracyTrapped ducks trying to get back across lakeshoreTrapped ducks!
Setting up the Super Stadium Trucks jumps!Reading the Super Stadium Trucks jumps!Video 2013-07-13 14 18 42Video 2013-07-13 14 30 20Video 2013-07-14 14 12 49Shea meets Shea

Toronto Indy 2013, a set on Flickr.

Posted on flickr, my photos from the Toronto Indy 2013. The highlight for me was the Stadium Super Trucks taking on the Indy tracks with the addition of jumps!

Half a year goes by, and I don’t make a blog post

Friday, July 5th, 2013

…sorry about that.  I used to be so good at making one post a month.

A lot of work has been going into things other than my blog.  Raising two kids takes a lot of work, and so far my wife hasn’t gone for the division of labour of one child each and Dad takes whichever is less work at the time.  The Brock University’s eLearning Initiative continues to be a lot of work.

But mostly, there are so many more [micro] ways to communicate these days.

More to come soon — this is my transition.

My Productive Practices

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

productive matrix

At this time of year the interwebs get very productive creating blog postings about productivity, and this blog is all about me adding  information to an existing saturation, so here goes:

These two recent articles have some good ideas for a more productive 2013:

Geeks are always keen to approach organizing their lives as an engineering problem.  Hence the obsession with David Allen’s Getting Things Done is a time-management methodology  and the steady flow of ideas that come out of lifehacker.com

Here’s what I consider my top five most productive practices:

  1. The OHIO principle for E-Mail: Only Handle It Once.  
    Don’t keep re-reading waiting until you’re ready for a response, choose to handle then or not respond at all (with an exception for the “can’t read this here” problem with mobile devices – but mark it as unread).  I’m not a dogmatic process-to-zero inbox person, but I do work sequentially. I’ll only mark as read when the messages is “no longer my responsibility” and some times that means responding asking for clarity to buy a little time and share the responsibility of transmitting a clear message.
  2. Tasks are important and ubiquitous.
    I think I’m one of the few people who values Microsoft Outlook’s Tasks feature, and there’s all kinds of other task Apps.  The trick for me is having those task synced across all my devices, so that when I have the moment of inspiration or recollection I record it easily.  Tasks (or your calendar) is often an important next step after E-Mail comes in that allows you to “deal” with it at an initial level and mark the message as read.  It’s also worth noting that a project is not a task.